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Become a 46er by climbing the High Peaks

March 22, 2012
Adirondack Daily Enterprise

The Adirondack Forty-Sixers are the climbers who have ascended the High Peaks of the Adirondacks. The first person to climb them all (1925) chose those mountains with an elevation of 4,000 feet or over. There were 46.

From this came the name of the present group. While a recent survey indicated a few of these mountains are less than 4,000 feet, the Adirondack Forty-Sixers retain the original listing. The Forty-Sixers are not part of the Adirondack Mountain Club, although many climbers belong to both organizations.

The purposes of the organization are the fostering and protection of the natural resources within the Adirondack Forest Preserve of the state of New York and the preservation of the wilderness character of the region. These purposes include, without excluding other appropriate means, educating the public by inspiring interest, encouragement, information and examples to those who engage in wilderness endeavor so they may be prepared to carry on their activities in a manner adapted to secure fullest enjoyment, safety and preservation of the wilderness.

In order to become a Forty-Sixer, you must climb the 46 mountains listed on this page. You must report these climbs in writing (no e-mails please) to the Historian of the Adirondack Forty-Sixers. Please write to: The Office of the Historian, Adirondack Forty-Sixers, P.O. Box 9046, Schenectady, NY 12309-0046.

We will start a personal climbing file as soon as you write us. You will be assigned a correspondent to help you and answer your questions. Each hiker is asked to write their correspondent, reporting the mountains, dates climbed, and companions. Each hiker should write their own reports. This includes children. Tell the Forty-Sixers what you saw, how you felt and what the climb meant to you. Your experience in the mountains are unique and interesting. The Forty-Sixers appreciate it when you share them. You are not required to report after every climb, but you should report in a timely manner, and at the very least, once a year.

Twenty of the 46 mountains are untrailed. In the past, each person was to sign the summit log in the canister on the summit, copy down the names of the three persons who signed the log before their party and include them in the report of their climb. You may continue to do this. This has been a long-standing Forty-Sixer tradition, the proof of having climbed the mountain. Because of the increasing number of climbers in recent years and the damage they may do to the fragile summits, it is no longer imperative that you sign the summit log in the canister. If you are having difficulty finding the canister, don't destroy the fragile alpine environment looking for it. Your word is sufficient that you reached the summit. ?(NOTE: The canisters have now been removed from the trailless peaks.)

When you have ascended 30 of the 46 peaks you will be an Aspiring Forty-Sixer. Your name will be placed on the Forty-Sixer mailing list. When you have reported climbing your 40th mountain you will receive a Questionnaire and a Mountain List. These are to be filled out and returned after climbing your 46th peak. You will then be recorded as an Adirondack Forty-Sixer and advised of membership. The following February you will be assigned a climbing number and at the spring meeting you will be presented a Certificate of Accomplishment.

People don't join the Forty-Sixers, they become one by climbing the 46 High Peaks. If they want recognition of their accomplishment, they need to report their climbs to the historian.

Once you report your 46th climb you will become a "Forty-Sixer to be Recorded." When you submit your questionnaire and mountain list you will become a "Recorded Forty-Sixer." Once you pay your dues you will become an "Active Forty-Sixer with all the privileges of membership.

(Source: www.adk46r.org)

 
 
 

 

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